Castle Tucker

Have you been to Castle Tucker in Wiscasset?  It is part of Historic New England, a trust that preserves historic houses and architectural designs.

TheCastlepoet writes,

“Perhaps the most original and prominent historic house in Wiscasset, Maine, Castle Tucker dates from 1807. It was built at the behest of Judge Silas Lee, a leading jurist and politician of the Federal period, when Wiscasset was the busiest port in the United States north of Boston. In 1858 Captain Richard H. Tucker, a local shipping magnate, purchased the house. Tucker subsequently enlarged the home, adding the Italian features that give it its distinctive appearance. Today, Castle Tucker is a museum owned and operated by Historic New England (formerly the Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities).”

The web site for this wonderful house is https://www.historicnewengland.org/property/castle-tucker/

The beginning of this site gives a concise description of the history of the house and what you will find there:

“A time capsule of Victorian taste

Wiscasset, Maine

Dramatically sited on a hill overlooking the Sheepscot River, Castle Tucker tells the story of a prominent shipping family’s life on the coast of Maine over a period of 150 years. From 1858 until the end of the twentieth century, both the Tucker family and their imposing house survived economic upheavals, emotional turmoil, and a rapidly changing outside world.

Built in 1807, the house was later redecorated and furnished to satisfy modern Victorian taste and sensibilities. A visit to Castle Tucker offers a glimpse into the everyday life of Mollie and Richard Tucker and their five children at the turn of the twentieth century. With three generations of family possessions on view, Castle Tucker is a time capsule that echoes with the voices of a remarkable Maine family.”

Look at the site.  Check out the pictures and history provided.  Castle Tucker is certainly worth the short trip to Wiscasset.

 

 

Maine Maple Sunday

Sunday, March 24th 2019, is Maine Maple Sunday.

For those of us who might be interested in touring a sugarhouse, a list of participants can be found here – Maine Maple Sunday Participants.  This is a great map of the many and varied sugarhouses open for tours.

For those of us who might be more interested in reading about Maple, here are a few titles to choose from.

Anytime Mapleson by Mordicai Gerstein.  Have you ever invited bears for breakfast?  Check out this picture book, and enjoy the story.

Maple by Lori Nichols.  A young girl and her maple tree . . .

Maple moon by Connie Brummel Crook.  Have you ever wondered how maple syrup was discovered?  This children’s book gives us a possible answer.

The maple sugar book : together with remarks on pioneering as a way of living in the twentieth century by Helen and Scott Nearing.  The Nearings discuss their experiences with making a living from maple sugaring, and also give a definitive account of an important American industry.

Maple syrup season by Ann Purmell.  Enjoy this picture book of a family working together to create yummy maple syrup.

Miracles on Maple Hill by Virginia Sorensen.  1957 Newbery Medal winner.  The father has returned from the war, moody and tired, so the family leaves the city and moves to the Pennsylvania countryside.

Nature’s sweetness : pure maple syrup by Paul Rossignol.  A good introduction to the maple sugaring process.

Sugaring season : making maple syrup by Diane Burns.  This is another picture filled book describing the process of making maple syrup – from the tree to the table.

Toronto Maple Leafs by Eric Zweig.  Tells the story of the Maple Leafs 100 years of hockey, as well as the importance of professional sports teams to the history and economy of a big city and a big sports league.

Latest Snowfall In Maine

Yes, we are tired of it. Yes, it seems it will never go away.  But, have you ever wondered when was the latest recorded snowfall in Maine?

 This was featured on B98.5 FM Central Maine’s Country Radio Station’s website:

The latest recorded snowfall in Maine goes to Caribou, Maine, on May 25, 1974 they recorded 0.2 inches of snow.

So, if you do see some flakes tomorrow and your furnace kicks on, it’s nothing we can’t handle. We’re Mainers!

And this confirms it from the

National Weather Service

Late Season Snowfall across northern Maine

…2nd latest measurable snowfall on record at Caribou, Maine…

A cold upper low tracked across northern Maine during the early morning hours of May 23, 2015.  The air mass was cold enough that the precipitation that fell across far northern Maine fell mainly as snow. A total of three tenths (0.3″) of an inch of snow was observed at Caribou, Maine on May 23, 2015. This broke the previous record for May 23rd of a trace of snow observed in 1990.  It was the greatest snowfall ever observed so late in the season. It was also the 2nd latest measurable snowfall on record at Caribou. The all-time latest measurable snowfall was May 25, 1974 when two tenths (0.2″) of an inch of snow was observed.