Narrow Gauge Cinema

The Kennebec Journal announced on July 7th that the Narrow Gauge Cinema in Farmington was opening a new drive-in theater in the lot behind the cinema.  It brought back all the memories of childhood that involved my parents loading the 4 kids and the dog into the station wagon with bags of popcorn to go to a drive-in theater.  The one we visited had a playground in front of the huge screen that the kids would all play on until dusk arrived and the first movie started.  We always tried to stay awake through intermission to see the second movie since that one was always a little “racier” as smaller children would have fallen asleep by the time it started.  Remember the speaker that was mounted on a pole which you would hang on your car window so you could clearly hear what was happening on the movie screen?  Cars were larger then and a family of 6 with a dog could easily enjoy a double feature at a drive-in without feeling totally cramped and on top of each other.  Below is a web site from the Smithsonian magazine that will help you remember the glory days of the drive-in.  And if you have never had the experience, then it will give you a sense of what you have missed.  Is the experience worth a trip to Farmington to see a double feature under the stars?  It just might be.

 

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/the-history-of-the-drive-in-movie-theater-51331221/

 

Scott Handville, Assistant Library Director

New Books in the Library!

FICTION:

The adventures of John Carson in several quarters of the world by Brian Doyle.  A young Robert Louis Stevenson is regaled by his landlord of tales of high adventure.

All grown up by Jami Attenberg.  A wickedly funny novel about a 39 year old single, childfree woman who defies convention as she seeks connection.

The arrangement by Sarah Dunn.  This is about a couple that agrees to have an open marriage, for a limited time only and while adhering to certain rules, is a polished, amusing, and highly entertaining take on modern relationships, parenthood, and suburbia.

The coming by David Osborne.  An historical novel beginning with the Lewis & Clark expedition and ending with the decimation of the Nez Perce tribe.  An epic and sure to be a hit with readers interested in the American western expansion.

Exit West by Mohsin Hamid.  Lovers in a city overwhelmed with violence hear about mysterious doors that will carry them into an alien and uncertain future.

Fast and loose by Stuart Woods.  Stone Barrington is enjoying a boating excursion off the Maine coast when a chance encounter leaves him somewhat the worse for wear.

Good time coming by C.S. Harris.  A powerful story of war’s destruction of property, people, hopes, and morals during the Civil War in Louisiana.  Top-notchy historical fiction reveals the Civil War in all its brutality.

The hearts of men by Nickolas Butler.  An epic novel of intertwining friendships and families set in the north woods of Wisconsin at a beloved Boy Scout summer camp.

The Hollywood daughter by Kate Alcott.  A Hollywood coming-of-age novel in which Ingrid Bergman’s affair with Roberto Rossellini forces her biggest fan to reconsider everything she was raised to believe.

The lost order by Steve Berry.  In the 12th Cotton Malone thriller, the former Justice Department operative pursues current and historical conspiracies.

Marlena by Julie Buntin.  A novel about love, addiction, and loss: the story of two girls and the feral year that will cost one her life and define the other’s for decades.

Miranda and Caliban by Jacqueline Carey.  This reimagines the back story of Shakespeare’s The Tempest as a tale of star-crossed lovers.

Never let you go by Chevy Stevens.  Eleven years ago Lindsay escaped with her young daughter and left an abusive relationship when her husband was jailed for a hit and run.  Now he is out of prison, and she is sure he will track her down.

Red sister by Mark Lawrence.  This begins a stunning epic fantasy series about a secret order of holy warriors.

The stars are fire by Anita Shreve.  This is a suspenseful novel about an extra-ordinary young woman tested by a catastrophic event and its devastating aftermath – based on the true story of the largest fire in Maine’s history.

Ties by Domenico Starnone.  Four years after leaving his wife and children, Aldo returns to them ready to rebuild.  A slim, studding meditation on marriage, fidelity, honesty, and truth.

The wages of sin by Kaite Welsh.  A tale of murder, subversion and vice in which a female medical student in Victorian Edinburgh is drawn into a murder investigation when she recognizes one of the corpses in her anatomy lecture.

Waking gods by Sylvain Neuvel.  Pure, unadulterated literary escapism featuring giant killer robots and the looming end of humankind.  In a word, unputdownable.

The wanderers by Meg Howrey. Three astronauts and their families must endure the effects of a pioneering deep-space mission.

The widow’s house by Carol Goodman.  Blends the gothic allure of Daphne DuMaurier and the crazed undertones of Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s The Yellow Wallpaper – this is a harrowing tale of psychological suspense set in New York’s Hudson Valley.

The young wives club by Julie Pennell.  Finding your one true love happens sometime around high school in Toulouse, Louisiana.  If you are lucky, he might be the man you thought he was.  But as four friends are about to find out, not every girl has luck on her side.

NEW DVDs:

A man called Ove (2016) starring Rolf Lassgard

Hell or high water (2016) starring Jeff Bridges and Chris Pine

The legend of Tarzan (2016) starring Alexander Skarsgard and Samuel Jackson

Roots (2016) starring Forest Whitaker and Anna Paquin

Reversal of fortune (1990) starring Jeremy Irons and Glenn Close

NONFICTION:

An American sickness by Elisabeth Rosenthal.  At a moment of drastic political upheaval, here is a shocking investigation into the dangerous, expensive, and dysfunctional American healthcare system, as well as solutions to its myriad of problems.

Dodge City by Tom Clavin.  This history of the “wickedest town in the West”, full of colorful characters, focuses on Wyatt Earp and Bat Masterson.

Enduring Vietnam by James Wright.  The Vietnam War remains the all-encompassing event of the baby boomer generation the author claims in this poignant account of those who fought and died there.  This is an important investigation of the war and its effects on an entire generation.

The face of water by Sarah Ruden.  The author elegantly celebrates and translates the bible’s original languages and looks at how passages have been misunderstood over the centuries.

Fallen glory by James Crawford.  This searching survey of some of humankind’s greatest architectural accomplishments looks at the lives and deaths of history’s greatest buildings.

The 40 year old vegan by Sandra Sellini. 75 recipes to make you leaner, cleaner, and greener in the second half of life.

How not to hate your husband after kids by Jancee Dunn.  A hilariously candid account of one woman’s quest to bring her post-baby marriage back from the brink, with life-changing, real-world advice.

March 1917 by Wil Englund.  A riveting history of the month that transformed the world’s greatest nations as Russia faced revolution and America entered World War I.

My Jewish year by Abigail Pogrebin.  This travels through the calendar’s signposts with candor, humor, and a trove of info, capturing the art of Jewish observance through the eyes of a relatable wandering – and wondering – Jew.

My master recipes by Patricia Wells.  165 recipes to inspire confidence in the kitchen – the perfect successor to Julia Child’s classic The Way to Cook.

Never caught by Erica Dunbar.  George Washington had a relentless pursuit – of his runaway slave, Ona Judge.

Strangers tend to tell me things by Amy Dickinson.  America’s most popular advice columnist, “Ask Amy”, shares her journey of family, second chances, and finding love.

2Brides 2Be by Laura Abby.  In response to the dearth of guides on same sex weddings, Abby draws from her own experience and that of wedding planners to create a handbook to help women achieve the wedding of their dreams.

Walking to listen by Andrew Forsthoefel.  A memoir of one young man’s coming of age on a cross-country trek – told through the stories of the people of all ages, races, and inclinations he meets along the highways of America.

Notes from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Library Journal, and New York Times Book Review.

Oscar Oddities

 With the Oscars this weekend, it’s fun to look back at some of the odd and interesting facts you may not have known about the big event:

  • Tom Hank’s acceptance speech for his role in Philadelphia became the basis of the film In & Out.
  • Oscar winners sign a contract stipulating they cannot sell their Oscar without first offering it back to the Academy for the sum of $1.
  • One of the requirements to be nominated for an Oscar is that the movie has to be screened in an LA theater for at least 7 days.
  • 3 people have turned down their Oscars, including George C. Scott, who called the awards show a “meat parade” in 1971 and Marlon Brando in 1972.
  • Woody Allen refuses to attend or present at the Oscars, despite winning three awards.  His one appearance was in 2002 when he presented a short about New York City following the September 11, 2001 attacks.
  • Maggie Smith won an Oscar for portraying an actress who lost an Oscar in California Suite, making it the only film revolving around the Oscars to win one.
  • The only film to show an Oscar in a scene while also winning Best Picture is The Godfather.
  • Alfred Hitchcock and William Holden share the record for shortest acceptance speech.  They simply said “Thank you.”
  • Sealed envelopes became customary in 1941, a year after the LA Times broke the press embargo and printed the names of all of the winners before the ceremony.
  • John C. Reilly is the only modern actor to star in three films in the same year that were later nominated for Best Picture: Chicago, The Hours, and Gangs of New York in 2002.
These Oscar oddities are from the web site: